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Horror stories about Muslim misogyny have long been used by western patriarchs to justify imperialism abroad and sexism at home. The Guardian’s Katharine Viner reminds us about Lord Cromer, the British consul general in Egypt from 1883. Cromer believed the Egyptians were morally and culturally inferior in their treatment of women and that they should be “persuaded or forced” to become “civilised” by disposing of the veil.

"And what did this forward-thinking, feminist-sounding veil-burner do when he got home to Britain?" asks Viner. "He founded and presided over the Men’s League for Opposing Women’s Suffrage, which tried, by any means possible, to stop women getting the vote. Colonial patriarchs like Cromer … wanted merely to replace eastern misogyny with western misogyny." More than a century later, the same logic is used to imply that misogyny only matters when it isn’t being done by white men.

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philalathe:

Moths I’ve found at work.

archatlas:

Macro with Dandelions Dimitar Lazarov

sea-snakes:

hanakoheals:

Baby octopi army!

I DON’T THINK ANYONE UNDERSTANDS HOW MUCH I NEED TO MAKE ALL OF THESE RIGHT NOW

earthandanimals:

A bunch of hopeless jerks said this baby was as good as dead. That makes this even better. <— Click the link for full article. :)

This is Biscuits. The little baby was found on the ground by someone just walking by on the sidewalk. Biscuits is a southern flying squirrel was half-dead, baking in the Florida sun. The man took her in immediately and began rehabilitating her. He was told by others that he didn’t have enough experience to save her and that she would die. As it turns out… they were all wrong. His love and devotion to this little squirrel saved her. Her recovery is one of the cutest things ever.

foresity:

Misty Forests by 

(Source: Foresity)

asylum-art:

Amazingly Delicate Paper Art Hand-Cut by Akira Nagaya

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Japanese artist Akira Nagaya creates insanely intricate paper cuttings called kirie that look like delicate pencil drawings or wire sculptures.

Nagaya discovered his talent in his early 20s when he was learning sasabaran – a technique for cutting food decorations from bamboo leaves at sushi shops. When he practiced on his own using paper and a utility knife, he realized that he was good at it and that he enjoyed it. Only later in his life, though, did he start to look at his paper cuttings as art and display them to the public.

"To live is to sink roots. Life is possible only to the extent that you find a place hospitable enough to receive you and allow you to settle down. What follows is a sort of symbiosis: Just as you grow into the world, the world grows into you. Not only do you occupy a certain place, but that place, in turn, occupies you. Its culture shapes the way you see the world, its language informs the way you think, its customs structure you as a social being. Who you ultimately are is determined to an important degree by the vast web of entanglements of “home.”"

Costica Bradatan (via slim)

(Source: The New York Times)

sludgeberry:

the underside of this thing is seriously gorgeous. pictures do not do it justice.