stripeszine:

Jesse Treece

Where are you from?   Born and raised in Seattle, Wa.

How long have you been working with collage?   I think it was late 2009 when I really started getting into it. Before that I used to draw and doodle on everything.

Do you have a favourite source to gather materials from?  I use National Geographic a lot but I try to mix it up. I have some great old books and magazines that I pick up at thrift stores. My most recent finds are books on gems and New Zealand, and some 70’s issues of Family Circle.

How do you think of your images? (Is it spontaneous, a vision, etc?)  I’ve been working very spontaneously lately and making these sort of minimal psychedelic landscapes that are populated less with people and more with otherworldly shapes, colors and vegetation. 

Favourite books?   I’m reading lots of graphic novels and comics right now but some favorite books from the last few years are The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, Neuromancer by William Gibson, The Child Garden by Geoff Ryman, The Valis trilogy by Philip K. Dick.

See more of his work here

magictransistor:

Illustrated Legends of the Kitano Tenjin Shrine (Kitano Tenjin Engi Emaki). Kamakura Period, Japan. 1200s.  

An ancient Shinto belief that the unpredictable, calamitous forces of nature are animated by tormented human spirits (onryō) underlies the legendary origin of the Kitano Tenjin shrine, dedicated to Sugawara Michizane (845–903). Michizane was a distinguished scholar, poet, and statesman who died in exile, having been slandered by enemies at court.

After his death, a series of extraordinary natural disasters and plagues caused the untimely deaths of his detractors. In an attempt to appease his vengeful spirit, he was posthumously pardoned and promoted to high office, but the disasters continued. In 942, Michizane’s spirit revealed his wish to be honored at a shrine dedicated to the thunder god in the northwestern section of the capital. He was deified as Tenjin, an ancient god of agriculture and patron of the falsely accused. Later, perhaps because poems were offered to him at the shrine, he came to be venerated as the Shinto god of literature and music. -Met

saddeer:

i can’t wait to not have kids and spend all my money on myself

pogoniptrail:

ravefromthegrave:

porcupunx:

female-only:

lesbianseparatist:

off our backs, august-september 1999

"It is a theory, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."

Amazing I can’t even.

postmodernism came into vogue in academia just when the voices of women and people of color began to assert a significant presence there

"The real agenda is masked in clever obfuscation—to preserve the status quo by rendering dissent meaningless…."

mothmonarch:

moregeous-tbh:

Found this ‘little’ guy last night. What a cutie.

I love Royal Walnut moths.

"In this surreal, upside-down vision of the world, it almost seems as if it is the Israelis who are occupied by the Palestinians, and not the other way around. In this skewed universe, the inmates of an open-air prison are besieging a nuclear-armed power with one of the most sophisticated militaries in the world."

Columbia University professor Rashid Khalidi on the United States’ support of current Israeli policy: http://nyr.kr/1nZTIwZ (via newyorker)

A blood test for suicide?

neurosciencestuff:

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.

image

The discovery, described online in The American Journal of Psychiatry, suggests that changes in a gene involved in the function of the brain’s response to stress hormones plays a significant role in turning what might otherwise be an unremarkable reaction to the strain of everyday life into suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

“Suicide is a major preventable public health problem, but we have been stymied in our prevention efforts because we have no consistent way to predict those who are at increased risk of killing themselves,” says study leader Zachary Kaminsky, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “With a test like ours, we may be able to stem suicide rates by identifying those people and intervening early enough to head off a catastrophe.”

For his series of experiments, Kaminsky and his colleagues focused on a genetic mutation in a gene known as SKA2. By looking at brain samples from mentally ill and healthy people, the researchers found that in samples from people who had died by suicide, levels of SKA2 were significantly reduced.

Within this common mutation, they then found in some subjects an epigenetic modification that altered the way the SKA2 gene functioned without changing the gene’s underlying DNA sequence. The modification added chemicals called methyl groups to the gene. Higher levels of methylation were then found in the same study subjects who had killed themselves. The higher levels of methylation among suicide decedents were then replicated in two independent brain cohorts.

In another part of the study, the researchers tested three different sets of blood samples, the largest one involving 325 participants in the Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention Research Study found similar methylation increases at SKA2 in individuals with suicidal thoughts or attempts. They then designed a model analysis that predicted which of the participants were experiencing suicidal thoughts or had attempted suicide with 80 percent certainty. Those with more severe risk of suicide were predicted with 90 percent accuracy. In the youngest data set, they were able to identify with 96 percent accuracy whether or not a participant had attempted suicide, based on blood test results.

The SKA2 gene is expressed in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, which is involved in inhibiting negative thoughts and controlling impulsive behavior. SKA2 is specifically responsible for chaperoning stress hormone receptors into cells’ nuclei so they can do their job. If there isn’t enough SKA2, or it is altered in some way, the stress hormone receptor is unable to suppress the release of cortisol throughout the brain. Previous research has shown that such cortisol release is abnormal in people who attempt or die by suicide.

Kaminsky says a test based on these findings might best be used to predict future suicide attempts in those who are ill, to restrict lethal means or methods among those a risk, or to make decisions regarding the intensity of intervention approaches.

He says that it might make sense for use in the military to test whether members have the gene mutation that makes them more vulnerable. Those at risk could be more closely monitored when they returned home after deployment. A test could also be useful in a psychiatric emergency room, he says, as part of a suicide risk assessment when doctors try to assess level of suicide risk.

The test could be used in all sorts of safety assessment decisions like the need for hospitalization and closeness of monitoring. Kaminsky says another possible use that needs more study could be to inform treatment decisions, such as whether or not to give certain medications that have been linked with suicidal thoughts.

“We have found a gene that we think could be really important for consistently identifying a range of behaviors from suicidal thoughts to attempts to completions,” Kaminsky says. “We need to study this in a larger sample but we believe that we might be able to monitor the blood to identify those at risk of suicide.”

mothmonarch:

greek-amara:

Bug swag

Way cool! Is that big sparkly beetle in the first photo a brooch?

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Aliza Razell: Magic and Mystic Photography

Flickrock, Facebook

Massachusetts-based artist Aliza Razell creates tickling self-portraits that explore philosophical abstractions through the merged mediums of watercolour and photography. Using Photoshop, Razell unites the two mediums in her Anesidora (explorations of the Pandora’s Box myth) and Ikävä (the Finnish word meaning the feeling of longing) series.